What type of person is most likely to cause a distracted driving accident?

What type of person is most likely to cause a distracted driving accident?

On Behalf of | Sep 14, 2021 | Car Accident |

Residents of Valencia and other areas of California may want to learn more about a certain type of person that is usually the cause of a distracted driving accident. There are certain types of personalities who do this. When motorists take their eyes off the road to check their feed, see their email, or fumble for their phone, there is a risk of an accident. They pose a danger to walkers, joggers and bicyclists, and motorcyclists as well as other vehicles.

According to psychology today, a study involved 273 survey participants polled by the ADAC (the German equivalent of the AAA). Revealed in the survey were three distinct types of personalities who engage in distracted driving.

The non-neurotic driver is agreeable and open

They are more interested in novelty and are less diligent and not focused on risk. Pleasing others is high on their list, as they quickly return texts and phone calls. They feel safe checking their phones and do so often.

The extroverted driver is open

They are highly agreeable, but low on being conscientious. They are social and seek new experiences.

These drivers say they have a lot on their minds, which causes their distraction. They may use their smartphone without thinking about it, especially while driving. They say they would be off their phones if they had tools for self-organization.

The conscientious driver is not open to novelty

This type of driver had a highly neurotic profile but was also conscientious as well as extroverted. They are not really open to new experiences. Conscientious drivers reported that they would be more aware of the risks if signs reminded them to stay off their phones. Their decisions would be more conscientious based on knowing the consequences and risks of distraction.

Drivers can avoid motor vehicle accidents from phones with help. Staying ahead of the curve is important, as cellphone use is on the rise.

Not only is seeing the personalities who are at risk important, but finding ways to remind these drivers of the dangers is imperative. Phones can be addictive, like alcohol, and they may even replace real relationships. The NHTSA has suggested designated texters, stops for cellphone usage, and, in dire circumstances, locking the phone in the trunk.